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MMRF Funded Grants

As the leading funder of multiple myeloma research, the MMRF has supported more than 325 research grants at over 125 institutions worldwide. The MMRF supports innovative research efforts in the most promising areas of multiple myeloma research through several grant-making programs. Please use the filtering options on the left side of this page to sort through the past MMRF grants shown below.

Please note that grant information for 1997-2005 has not yet been uploaded; thank you for your patience as we work to include this information.

Biomarker Discovery and Validation in Multiple Myeloma Cells Using Multiple Proteomic Platforms.2007
Year Awarded: 2007 Type of Grant: Proteomics
Location: United States Institution: Indiana University (Indianapolis)
Amount: $750,000 Investigator: Mu Wang

Proteomic profiling in Multiple Myeloma
Year Awarded: 2007 Type of Grant: Proteomics
Location: United States Institution: University of Arkansas
Amount: $750,000 Investigator: Ricky Edmonson

Multiple Myeloma and Bone: Understanding the Destruction
Year Awarded: 2007 Type of Grant: Research Fellow Awards
Location: United States Institution: Mayo Clinic Rochester
Amount: $75,000 Investigator: Matthew Drake
More than 80% of patients with myeloma have bone damage, including severe bone pain and fractures. Myeloma cells themselves, however, do not destroy bone. Rather they change the activity of the body��_s own bone forming and bone degrading cells. Several factors produced by myeloma cells which can affect bone cells have been identified. The changes induced within bone forming and bone degrading cells, however, have not been determined. This application seeks to identify these changes. Such findings should identify ways in which these bone cell activities can be altered to reduce the skeletal destruction in patients with myeloma.

Targeting CD40 therapy using humanized Mabs alone or with ImiD3 in human Multiple Myeloma
Year Awarded: 2006 Type of Grant: Senior Research Awards
Location: United States Institution: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Amount: $100,000 Investigator: Yu-Tzu Tai

High throughput exon-scanning of Kinome in Multiple Myeloma
Year Awarded: 2006 Type of Grant: Senior Research Awards
Location: United States Institution: Mayo Clinic Arizona
Amount: $100,000 Investigator: Keith Stewart

Translation studies of IGFS/IGF-1R
Year Awarded: 2006 Type of Grant: Senior Research Awards
Location: United States Institution: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Amount: $100,000 Investigator: Constantine Mitsiades

Refining mechanisms of resistance to Velcade: Clinical implication
Year Awarded: 2006 Type of Grant: Senior Research Awards
Location: United States Institution: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Amount: $100,000 Investigator: Teru Hideshima

Establishment of a Panel of Diverse Human Myeloma Cell Lines
Year Awarded: 2006 Type of Grant: Cell Line
Location: United States Institution: Mayo Clinic Rochester
Amount: Not Available Investigator: Diane Jelinek
Multiple myeloma (MM) is a devastating plasma cell cancer. Median survival is currently ~3 years but some patients live longer than 10 years, underscoring the patient-to-patient variability of this disease. A valuable tool in better understanding the biology and treatment of disease has been the establishment and study of continuously growing human myeloma cell lines (HMCLs). However, currently existing HMCLs only provide a model system for one subgroup of MM disease (referred to as ��_nonhyperdiploid��_). The overall goal of this proposal is therefore to establish new HMCLs from patients with all types of myeloma, particularly those referred to as hyperdiploid.

Generation of cell lines from primary multiple myeloma and MGUS tumors
Year Awarded: 2006 Type of Grant: Cell Line
Location: United States Institution: NCI/CCR/GB
Amount: Not Available Investigator: Michael Kuehl
Multiple myeloma (MM) includes several closely related groups (diseases) that differ in clinical features, and response to therapy. Cell lines that can be grown in the laboratory provide a powerful tool for identifying the genetic abnormalities that cause MM, and also new therapies. Unfortunately, cell lines have been generated only from a fraction of advanced tumors, and some MM tumor groups are not represented by existing cell lines. We propose to put genes that facilitate survival and growth into MM tumor cells so that cell lines can be generated at a high efficiency from all kinds of MM tumors.

Anti-Pleiotrophin-Mediated Therapy for the Treament of Multple Myeloma
Year Awarded: 2006 Type of Grant: Validation of Novel Compounds
Location: United States Institution: The Institute for Myeloma and Bone Cancer Research
Amount: Not Available Investigator: James Berenson
We have identified a new tumor growth factor for multiple myeloma (MM) called pleiotrophin (PTN). PTN levels are higher in the blood of MM patients. An anti-PTN antibody slowed tumor growth and blood vessel development in MM laboratory models. These results suggest that a therapeutic antibody could provide an important new anti-MM treatment. We propose to develop this new PTN-antibody and test its effects on MM in preclinical studies. We will also determine the proteins that PTN targets on the surface of myeloma cells. These studies will provide support for the clinical development of a new therapy for myeloma patients.

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